What To Eat In Fukushima Japan | CoolJapan

Sprawled out from the mountainous interior of northeastern Honshu towards the Pacific coastline, Fukushima is the third largest prefecture in Japan. The place is blessed with a rich and varied landscape, which lends itself to the abundance of produce in the region.


Eryuda waterfall Fukushima

Eryuda waterfall in autumn (Photo by: Fukushima Prefecture Tourism and Local Products Association)


In fact, Fukushima is also known as the 'Fruit Kingdom' because of the wide variety of fruits it produces each year, from peaches and persimmons to apples and grapes. The climate in Fukushima is ideal for cultivating fruits because of the extreme difference in temperatures across the seasons. Winters in Fukushima are freezing cold while summers are hot and blustery; this variance in temperature provides the optimum conditions for growing delicious fruit.


Peaches in Fukushima

Photo by: Fukushima Prefecture Tourism and Local Products Association


Of all the fruits produced in Fukushima, peaches are probably its most popular export. Fukushima is Japan’s second-largest peach-growing prefecture. Ever since the 2011 nuclear reactor crisis, farmers in Fukushima have also doubled their efforts to prove the attractiveness of their produce, with Furuyama Fruit Farm even striving to produce the world’s sweetest peach.

Of course, you don’t have to fork out USD7,000 for this record-breaking momo. The harvest season for peaches in Fukushima starts in mid-July and stretches till the start of October, which means the entire prefecture is rife with the sweet yield.

Apart from fruits, here are some signature dishes to try when you visit this epicurean paradise:

Kozuyu 


This soup is made with a medley of diced ingredients — root vegetables, scallops, wood ear mushroom, dried shiitake mushrooms and gingko nut — simmered slowly until it becomes a rich, hearty broth. Typically eaten during celebrations and ceremonial events, kozuyu is often served in elegant red lacquerware.


Kozuyu in Fukushima

Photo from: Fukushima Prefecture Tourism and Local Products Association 


Where to try it: Kagota, an izakaya located in the city of Aizuwakamatsu, serves a version of kozuyu that is cooked in a rich scallop stock.

Wappa meshi


Originally from Hinoemata Village in the southwestern corner of Fukushima, this dish is composed of steamed rice and seasonal vegetables picked from the surrounding Aizu mountains, packed in a traditional wooden lunch box.


Wappa meshi in Fukushima

Photo from: Fukushima Prefecture Tourism and Local Products Association 


Where to try it:  Takino, said to be the pioneer of wappa meshi, is also located in Aizuwakamatsu. Here, they serve the steamed rice dish in a traditional bent cypress bowl. If you’re feeling indulgent, you can also opt for their kaiseki spread, which is prepared using local seasonal ingredients.

Soba


While buckwheat noodles is eaten across Japan, the soba in Fukushima is unique because buckwheat has been cultivated in Aizu for generations and has a distinctively chewy texture and delicate aroma. Instead of using chopsticks, enjoy your soba like the locals do with single raw scallion stalk to eat with.


Soba in Fukushima

Photo from: Fukushima Prefecture Tourism and Local Products Association


Where to try it: Misawaya, located in the picturesque town of Ouchijuku in the Minamiaizu District, is famous for their handmade soba. You can even try your hand at making your own soba using the traditional stone mill.

Nishin no sansho zuke


This is a dish of herring pickled with sansho peppers. It is prepared by first thoroughly cleaning and drying the fish. From there, the fish filets are layered with sansho pepper leaves and then pickled in soy sauce, sake, sugar and vinegar. With its strong aroma and punchy flavours, nishin no sansho zuke may not suit everybody’s palate but the dish pairs beautifully with sake.


Nishin no sansho zuke in Fukushima

Photo from: Fukushima Prefecture Tourism and Local Products Association


Where to try it: This delicacy originated from and can only be found in Aizu city but you should be able to order it at most local restaurants.


(Cover photo from: Fukushima Prefecture Tourism and Local Products Association)

READ MORE ON THIS TOPIC
  1. 1.Eryuda Waterfall
  2. 2.Furuyama Fruit Farm
  3. 3.Kagota
  4. 4.Takino
  5. 5.Misawaya
  • Sights & Attractions
  • Hotels & Stays
  • Food & Drinks
  • Shopping
  • Services